The lines between home and garden have become increasingly blurred in recent times, with the trend for a natural flow between outdoors and in growing in popularity.

But merging the plants and flowers in your garden and your interior décor can sometimes be a bit of a feat, creating a stark difference in design between the garden and the house. 

But by using rattan furniture to landscape your garden, you could not only create a stylish and functional outside space, but also a way in which to blend both worlds together. Here are a few ideas about how you could use rattan furniture to achieve this. 

Create an extension 

Rather than considering your garden in isolation when re-designing your home, it's far better to view the green space outside as an extension of what lies within. 

By thinking about your garden as a continuation of what's within your front room, you are far more likely to create a complementary design. Having a garden which complements the design of your property can be particularly beneficial if you like to entertain or hold frequent barbecues. Guests can then wander between your home and your garden without being struck by a stark contrast between the two.

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A sensible use of rattan

Image source; https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3457/3280123833_c672a706b7.jpg 

Rattan furniture is just a small part of this, and other features such as matching tiles or complementary tableware can also help to create the illusion. 

Keep your style consistent

There's lots of fabulous rattan furniture which would flatter every garden but you have to consider whether it goes with the style of your house.

A sharp modern dining set with clean lines and a contemporary design may be a thing of beauty, but if you have an old house which has been decorated with period furniture, you might find a more traditional style better suits the existing décor and construction of the house. 

Consider colour 

Having a dedicated colour scheme which dominates both your home and garden can help make it feel as if one area flows into the other, without a marked step between the two.

Choosing colours doesn't mean you need to plump for a bright and garish hue; you can still opt for more muted, neutral tones if that's what you prefer.

However, if you are happy to incorporate a splash of colour here and there, what better way than to draw inspiration from the blooms in your garden?

By using the flowers and plants to help plan your colour scheme, you will be creating a real sense of togetherness in the overall landscaping. 

Be clever with your furniture

With rattan dining sets, loungers and cube seating, there's a huge variety of choice for the discerning shopper. 

This can lead to the temptation to buy lots of different rattan furniture and somehow cram it all in. If you have a large garden you may well be able to incorporate quite a lot of rattan furniture but for smaller gardens, you could just end up feeling cramped.

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This swing / rattan daybed is a nice garden item

Image Source: https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8080/8413277408_5694c4d03d.jpg 

If you want an outdoors dining area but don't really have the room, there are a number of different sets which feature chairs which slid under the table and out of view when not in use. These kind of clever designs allow rattan furniture to play a pivotal role in every garden, regardless of the size.  

Landscaping is about the subtle use of props to accentuate the best features of a garden. By not overcrowding your garden with chairs and so on, you will be able to use the furniture to far greater effect. 

Conclusion

Rattan furniture can play a very big role in the way a garden is designed, and with careful landscaping it can create the illusion that the outdoors space and inside match perfectly. Less can often be more; the goal is not to cram as many features as possible into your garden, but to highlight key pieces, allowing the quality of your rattan to speak volumes.

Image Credits: Dominus Vobiscum and Wicker Paradise